Codes

Promotes Language Acquisition

The ear symbol identifies materials or strategies that support student language acquisition through use of the target language. This language development (listening and speaking) is subconsciously acquired through using the target language.

Promotes Language Learning

The book symbol identifies materials or strategies that support formal language learning of reading and writing.

Respects the Silent Period


When a student has begun learning a second language they can experience a period of a few days up to several months when they will not speak the second language. Research shows that their progress will be as good or better than peers who speak more.

Primary Language Learning


The world map symbol identifies materials or strategies that support students in the use of their primary language as a means for acquiring a second language. Research shows that first language development is a benefit to second language development.

Encourages Higher-Order Thinking


The lightning bolt symbol identifies materials or strategies that support higher-order thinking such as analysis and synthesis, challenging language learners to acquire language through academic content.

Promotes Feedback


The cyclical arrow symbol identifies materials or strategies that encourage feedback from native language speaking teachers and or peers which is crucial to language acquisition.

Encourages Interaction


The dialogue bubbles symbol identifies materials or strategies that support real communication through social interaction - essential to language development.

Student-Centered


The head symbol identifies materials or strategies that support student-centered teaching wherein student’s needs and interests are central. Student-centered teaching is an important part of valid, reliable, and fair assessment of language learning.

Links Past Learning


The links symbol identifies materials or strategies that support a linkage between past learning and what students are learning in the moment. For learning to occur, students must understand and explicitly what they learned in the past that connects to what they are learning now.

Everyday ELL is now Every Language Learner.