Idiom of the Week Pocket Chart


Idioms are fun and useful phrases, but they can drive confused students up a wall! Teaching students about these expressions will be a piece of cake with this fun vocabulary development aid with a twist — appealing, large-format cartoons that will tickle the funny bone and help students understand these common phrases in their reading and use them in their writing and speaking.

Unlock a treasure trove of common idiomatic expressions!

    • Engages students with funny illustrated cards that help them tackle the differences between literal and figurative language
    • A lighthearted way to enrich vocabulary and improve comprehension for all students, particularly ELLs
    • Includes 20 double–sided idiom cards (40 total idiom cartoons) featuring full–color illustrations and measuring 11"L x 12"H
    • Provides 2 clear display pockets—one for the week's idiom card and the other for a student's illustrated sentence using the idiom
  • Grommeted nylon chart measures 13"W x 28"H and features a handy reverse–side storage pocket and an accompanying Activity Guide
  • Grades 3+

Common Core State Standards Alignment: 

L.3.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings. Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in context (e.g., take steps). 

L.4.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. 

L.5.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

Activities

GET REAL!

After the discussion of an idiom, have students write and illustrate a sentence using the idiom's "real" meaning. After a discussion of the idiom "it's raining cats and dogs," students might write sentences about rainstorms. A student might write, "I wore my boots and took my umbrella because it was raining cats and dogs." Display students' work on a rotating basis in the bottom pocket of your chart during the week your class is studying the idiom.

HIT THE BOOKS

Students can research idioms and their history on the Internet or in idiom dictionaries. Have each student illustrate the literal meaning of an idiom and present it to the class. Encourage students to guess the idioms that are represented in the drawings and to determine their real meanings. Bind the pictures in a class book of "Incredible Idioms." This makes a good reference book for your class library.

THE WRITING ON THE WALL

Create an Idiom Wall where students can record idioms that they encounter while reading. This makes a great resource for students to use in their own reading and writing. If you wish, you can divide the wall into categories, such as idioms about animals, idioms about food, body parts, feelings, and exercise or movement.

Material Code 0601


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